Category Archives: feminism

There is no shame in disclosure

Huma tweets at @Huma101 and blogs at humamunshi.

 

As an equalities professional I have always been extremely keen to get people to tick those little monitoring boxes – the ones that ask your ethnic background or gender, for example. All my professional learning has led me to believe that we need accurate equalities data to ensure we are recruiting diverse staff or to ensure our services and projects are being accessed by diverse groups, otherwise we would need to adapt to make our work fit for purpose.Not only is it our legal obligation to get this right but, to me, it has always made practical sense.

Continue reading There is no shame in disclosure

An open letter to gaslighters on triggers, trauma, and women’s anger

This post was submitted anonymously.

[Trigger warning: rape]

 

Why is gaslighting – even the minor kind – such a powerful trigger?

I didn’t know there was a word for gaslighting until recently. I’m so relieved that there is. You know when I am upset, or triggered, or insulted, or angry about something, and you tell me I’ve misunderstood it? That my feelings are wrong, that my experience is wrong? Yeah, that makes me pretty mad. Continue reading An open letter to gaslighters on triggers, trauma, and women’s anger

On being the crazy feminist in the room

Kristin tweets at @kristincraiglai and blogs at ShutUpLucille.com She is also a feminist life coach practising in Toronto.

I have a hard time saying that I’m disabled. I feel like that’s a term I’m not allowed to use, like I’m not disabled enough to use the term without being told off for co-opting a marginalized identity. I imagine that many people living with mental illness have similar internal struggles. But if you were to ask me how my mental illnesses (C-PTSD, social anxiety and depression) restrict my ability to function in the world I would tell you that I have to think carefully about the probability of being triggered before I go anywhere unfamiliar. I would tell you that I often have to suss out where I will run and hide if I get triggered or overwhelmed. I would explain that I have to bring a collection of items out with me in the hopes that they could help ground me in the event of an “episode”. I would also tell you that I am constantly assessing new acquaintances for how safe I think they are. If I have a breakdown will they get impatient or irritated with me? Will they be compassionate? Will they condescend to me and treat me like an injured kitten? Will they try to solve all my problems by offering insultingly obvious advice? Or will they just ignore it because my mental illness makes them uncomfortable? It’s not always easy to tell and I’ve been surprised more than once by a “friend’s” lack of compassion. As for work, how many work places are truly willing to accommodate an employee who sometimes has to call in triggered? How many employers would even hire someone if they knew that they had a history of mental illness? And who’s going to give me the flexibility I need to be able to attend appointments necessary for my treatment? Continue reading On being the crazy feminist in the room

Eating disorders and women’s roles

Olivia tweets at @nenfeataiko and blogs at Why Do They Do It?

[Trigger warning: discusses eating disorders, without numbers.]

Often when we hear about feminism and eating disorders we hear things like “the media’s focus on thinness is causing eating disorders!” or “unrealistic beauty expectations are the cause of eating disorders!” As a feminist, a woman, and someone with an eating disorder, I find these kinds of statements offensive. The real relationship between gender expectations and eating disorders is far more complicated than that. Continue reading Eating disorders and women’s roles

Trigger

Rachel blogs at Funny Grrrl and tweets at @FunnyGrrrl

[Trigger warning: discusses rape culture and the experience of being triggered.]

Rape culture ruins everything, man. I’m having a nice dinner with my Joe, teasing him about his travels – he once walked The Road To Santiago – and trying to seem interested when he decides to explain to me (at length) the plot of one of the Canterbury Tales.

Continue reading Trigger

Running with wolves – imposter syndrome & sexism in science

This post was submitted anonymously.

I have my very own wolf. It pads beside me all through my working day. It is not the friendly type of wolf that you dream of owning as a child. It is vicious, snarling and without mercy, it is has a name, but not one that I gave it. It is called ‘imposter syndrome’.

Continue reading Running with wolves – imposter syndrome & sexism in science

Schizophrenia, forced treatment, and gender

Katy tweets at @SchizophrenicGB and blogs at ‘Female, Twenty Something, Schizophrenic, GSOH’ 

She also creates Still Here Magazine, a free online mental health magazine, available at www.stillheremagazine.com

[Content note: discusses the experience of hallucinations, forced treatment and restraint.]

Why Gender Needs Considering in Mental Health Care

Continue reading Schizophrenia, forced treatment, and gender

A lived experience of anorexia, a lesbian feminist perspective

This post was submitted anonymously.

[Trigger warning: discusses eating disorders, without numbers]

Let me preface this with a slight disclaimer: I’m not a mental health professional, I have no background in any form of psychology or psychiatry – my experiences are purely personal and anecdotal relating to my own thoughts on my experiences.

Almost 15 years ago, I made my first conscious effort to avoid eating by giving away my lunch. Continue reading A lived experience of anorexia, a lesbian feminist perspective